ADAT (Alesis Digital Audio Tape) (1992 – 2003)

ADAT was a digital audio recording format, and was aimed at the professional studio market. It was introduced by Alesis and the first recorders were shipped in 1992.

ADAT could record up to 8 tracks, but multiple machines could be connected and synchronised to create recordings with up to 128 tracks. At the time, the only alternatives were 2 track DAT machines or very expensive digital open reel (DTRS was introduced a year later). ADAT was very sucessful, partly due to its affordability, and over 110,000 ADAT recorders were sold worldwide.

The recorder used S-VHS cassettes as the recording medium. Although intended for analogue video recording, these tapes were ideal for ADAT, with their width allowing for 8 tracks, good quality, and easy availability at the time. Although specially made S-VHS cassettes were available for the ADAT format, any premium-quality S-VHS video cassette could be used, though it was recommended to be no more than 120 minutes long (when used for ADAT, up to 40 minutes per tape was possible).

The first generation of ADAT recorders (also known as ‘Blackface’) recorded at 16 bits per sample (ADAT Type I). Later generations supported 20 bits per sample (ADAT Type II) but were backward compatible with recordings from the first generation.

ADAT was discontinued in 2003, but the name lived on in the ADAT HD24, a hard-drive based recorder.

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